In Defense of Lamarck: Historical, Philosophical, and Biological Vindication of Evolution’s First Big Idea

Despite being one of the most influential of the early modern biologists and having crucially paved the way for Darwin, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck has mostly gone down in history for being wrong. His theory of “use and disuse” as a mechanism for evolution was roundly rejected and is often presented in introductory biology textbooks as totally misguided and even… More In Defense of Lamarck: Historical, Philosophical, and Biological Vindication of Evolution’s First Big Idea

What I’ve been up to while this blog’s been quiet

With the great things I’m sure you’re reading, I doubt you’ve noticed that The Human Evolution Blog has been pretty quiet the past few months. I’m working on the next post and hope to get it up soon, but I wanted to share some of the other writing I’ve been doing lately: In August, I wrote this… More What I’ve been up to while this blog’s been quiet

Lee Berger, Tim White, and Homo naledi: A New Fight, the Old Way, and the Future of Paleoanthropology

In case you missed it, I wrote a magazine article! Here’s how it happened. I was following the arguments between Tim White and Lee Berger playing out in the press, with White insisting Homo naledi was actually just H. erectus and Berger defending his work, with both trading pointed barbs. However, the words of Ian Tattersall’s latest book were ringing… More Lee Berger, Tim White, and Homo naledi: A New Fight, the Old Way, and the Future of Paleoanthropology

New Research Characterizes Mountain Gorilla “Friendships”

“I get by with a little help from my friends.” The more we look, the more we find. This is especially true when it comes to the social dynamics of animals. Scientists continue to document the complex nature of social relationships, particularly in birds and mammals. It seems we are constantly saying, “I didn’t know animals did… More New Research Characterizes Mountain Gorilla “Friendships”